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Funding Goal
Base Goal: $3000
Progress So Far: $116
4%
Stretch Goal: $2,000
Progress So Far: $0
0%

Updated: 2017-01-14 --martyb


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Poll

Favorite cheese?

  • Brie
  • Havarti
  • Pecorino-Romano
  • Camembert
  • Casu Marzu
  • Cheddar (Philistine)
  • Wendsleydale
  • Cottage

[ Results | Polls ]
Comments:0 | Votes:0

posted by charon on Saturday March 18 2017, @07:57PM   Printer-friendly
from the found-by-Mars-rover-during-testing dept.

In Chile a woody vine, Boquila trifoliolata, has been discovered to change the shape of its leaves depending on what tree is is climbing.

Further, the same single vine can drape from one tree to different species of tree, and it will match the shape and size of its leaves to those of each host only along that portion of its length.

Other vines are known to mimic one species of host, as a defense against herbivores, but this vine can mimic many, along its length.

Biologists say "It is unclear how B. trifoliolata vines discern the identity of individual trees and shape-shift accordingly." Speculation is that chemicals or microbes might trigger gene-activating signals that trigger leaf differentiation.

But left unsaid is how would the vine "learn" match the shape of its new host's leaf, how it would know it had succeeded, where it would acquire the genes to do so, and how many different trees it can mimic.

Don't you need eyes to copy someone else's look?


Original Submission

posted by charon on Wednesday January 18 2017, @07:57PM   Printer-friendly
from the found-by-Mars-rover-during-testing dept.

In Chile a woody vine, Boquila trifoliolata, has been discovered to change the shape of its leaves depending on what tree is is climbing.

Further, the same single vine can drape from one tree to different species of tree, and it will match the shape and size of its leaves to those of each host only along that portion of its length.

Other vines are known to mimic one species of host, as a defense against herbivores, but this vine can mimic many, along its length.

Biologists say "It is unclear how B. trifoliolata vines discern the identity of individual trees and shape-shift accordingly." Speculation is that chemicals or microbes might trigger gene-activating signals that trigger leaf differentiation.

But left unsaid is how would the vine "learn" match the shape of its new host's leaf, how it would know it had succeeded, where it would acquire the genes to do so, and how many different trees it can mimic.

Don't you need eyes to copy someone else's look?


Original Submission

posted by charon on Saturday December 31 2016, @09:59PM   Printer-friendly
from the for-serious,-it's-not-a-real-story dept.

If a story has no topic or no nexus, will it appear? No one knows except the big cheeses, and they ain't talking.

*

*

posted by The Mighty Buzzard on Monday August 08 2016, @06:42PM   Printer-friendly
from the bouncy-bouncy-bouncy dept.

I think they're quite nice.


Original Submission

Adding a blockquote for funky css testing purposes.

posted by The Mighty Buzzard on Tuesday July 26 2016, @04:37AM   Printer-friendly
from the foo-bar-baz-bot dept.

The charges detail lavish gifts officials are accused of receiving and stem from one of several continuing investigations into Mayor Bill de Blasio’s fund-raising.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/21/nyregion/new-york-police-arrest.html

-- submitted from IRC


Original Submission

posted by charon on Friday March 18 2016, @07:42PM   Printer-friendly
from the found-by-Mars-rover-during-testing dept.

In Chile a woody vine, Boquila trifoliolata, has been discovered to change the shape of its leaves depending on what tree is is climbing.

Further, the same single vine can drape from one tree to different species of tree, and it will match the shape and size of its leaves to those of each host only along that portion of its length.

Other vines are known to mimic one species of host, as a defense against herbivores, but this vine can mimic many, along its length.

Biologists say "It is unclear how B. trifoliolata vines discern the identity of individual trees and shape-shift accordingly." Speculation is that chemicals or microbes might trigger gene-activating signals that trigger leaf differentiation.

But left unsaid is how would the vine "learn" match the shape of its new host's leaf, how it would know it had succeeded, where it would acquire the genes to do so, and how many different trees it can mimic.

Don't you need eyes to copy someone else's look?


Original Submission